poetry

Bearing the Mask: Southwestern Persona Poems edited by Scott Wiggerman and Cindy Huyser

Bearing the Mask: Southwestern Persona Poems edited by Scott Wiggerman and Cindy Huyser

I was drawn to Bearing the Mask, Southwestern Persona Poems for two reasons. The first is that I feel a reverent love for the Southwest. I spend many days each year exploring its canyons, rivers, and wild lands and have had the honor of hearing stories from many of its residents—white, Latina, indigenous. The second is that I feel personally activated by the movement at Standing Rock. It feels both timely and revolutionary to give light to a body of work that illustrates the relationship between people and their homeland with all its beauty and complexity.

Read More

Marys of the Sea by Joanna C. Valente

Marys of the Sea by Joanna C. Valente

If the current state of American politics has caused its public to become obsessed with apocalyptic imagery, then Marys of the Sea perhaps reflects Valente's vision of misogyny and rape culture as a zombie virus infecting the populace. Valente's narrator devours the world as retribution for the ways in which her own flesh has been metaphorically consumed.

Read More

Mysteries in a World That Thinks There Are None by Gary McDowell

Mysteries in a World That Thinks There Are None by Gary McDowell

The first thing I did after reading Mysteries in a World That Thinks There are None was look up works by Eric Fischl. I had not been acquainted with his work before and McDowell refers to him regularly in his poems. After an Internet gallery stroll, I felt like I’d been touring a family photo album, yet embedded in its snapshots were overlays of the human unconscious brought to light, filling it sometimes with violence and sexual innuendo that the eyes don’t often see in pictures reminiscent of a vacation slide show. 

Read More

Franklinstein by Susan Landers

Franklinstein by Susan Landers

How does one write about something that, in a way, resists the fundamental ways we often approach writing? As a glance at any of Franklinstein's blurbs will tell you, Susan Landers has written a book that is somehow history, memoir, and poetry all at once. In a kind of explanation of this refusal to be just one thing, Landers writes early on, “To come closer / to come to see / this writing must meander.” From the beginning, we know that Landers' writing is not only a telling of, but also a searching for, what has happenedto her and to the Philadelphia Germantown of her upbringing. By the end, it is not clear whether she has found what she's searching for; but what her searching has amounted to, you'll want to read and revisit again and again.

Read More