Nomadic Press

How to Change the World - On Sitting in a Chinese Garden

How to Change the World - On Sitting in a Chinese Garden

In the latest edition of the experiential review series "How to Change the World"  James Thomas takes us to Dr. Sun Yat-Sen Classical Chinese Garden in Vancouver, B.C. James thoughtfully observes the emotional qualities of the garden's architecture and reminds the reader to appreciate the wonders that often lie right under our nose or in this case, behind a wall: - The Chinese Garden is a little enclave of harmony planted in the midst of a city. It is the same way we are. Little organic bodies moving through an ecosystem of concrete, steel and fumes. The sounds of the city peek over the garden walls. The tall buildings look in from their deep foundations.The city birds perch on street lamps and perch in trees.

Read More

How to Change the World - Sol Bailey Barker - "Between Night and Day"

How to Change the World - Sol Bailey Barker - "Between Night and Day"

The work of Sol Bailey-Barker draws its breaths from myths, legends and mathematics. He courts the earth with sculptures that balance like satellite dishes upon ancient cairns. His pieces evoke the stars and spectrums of deep carbon. Hollowness, balance and light fused with deep thoughtful meditations on being, change and symbol. In the latest edition of the experiential  review series "How to Change the World"  James Thomas takes us deep into the world of "Between Night and Day", Sol Bailey Barker's current exhibition curated by Kaleidoscope, Mayfair, London.

Read More

Some Versions of the Ice by Adam Tipps Weinstein

Some Versions of the Ice by Adam Tipps Weinstein

The essays in Some Versions of the Ice are erudite, intertextual, and jarring—they combine the complexities of the natural world with those of the perceptions of it made by minds prone to error. With topics ranging from touchable language (Braille) to the history of the collar, this work was one I could not stop reading, circling, returning to. Weinstein begins the essay “Graveyard Shoes” with a Yeats quote so appropriate, it could easily be used to describe his own work as well, “This organism is now acknowledged by naturalists as belonging to the animal world.”

Read More

Staying Alive by Laura Sims

Staying Alive by Laura Sims

At an Adamic level, humans have always, it seems, been destined to destruct or self-destruct. On an atomic level, the world once seemed scientifically determined to remain in certain composite, certain constitution, certain form or energy. Today, however, we know that to be untrue. Staying Alive, the most recent collection of bare(ing) poems by Laura Sims, is a documentation of sorts, a reckoning with the end as we may think it, predict it, and already begin to feel it.

Read More

Crave by Christine Gelineau

Crave by Christine Gelineau

Gelineau’s Crave does not require metaphor—reality is enough. This work is rooted in the clear, precise, deadpan truth of everyday life, be it marriage, death, crime, illness, love, birth, children, nature, beauty, passion, intimacy, or surrender—an entire spectrum of issues, none of which are glamorized or glossed over. These pages of memories and stories are also revivals of love, tenderness, pain, loss, closeness, devotion—things people desperately need, not only to feel alive, but to feel the point of it. This piece is as much a memoir as it is poetry. And yet at once it is astonishingly fresh, current, and relevant. These are stories that our high-speed, technological world needs to understand if it is to stay in balance.

Read More

The Gulf: High Culture/Hard Labor Edited by Andrew Ross

The Gulf: High Culture/Hard Labor Edited by Andrew Ross

Much has been written in recent years about the exploitative labor practices inherent to globalization, especially those pertaining to vulnerable migrant workers from the developing states. The Gulf: High Culture/Hard Labor, edited by Andrew Ross and featuring a deep bench of contributors from the social sciences, labor advocacy groups, and protest artists from around the world, provides a distinct voice and a highly specific contribution to the conversation. Focusing on the labor systems and practices of Persian Gulf states and the massive investments those states have recently made in cultural institutions–landmark museums, Western university satellite campusesThe Gulf makes a compelling case for opportunities to shine light on both egregious conditions ongoing from Dubai and Abu Dhabi to Riyadh, as well as opportunities to confront and dismantle these oppressive systems.

Read More

Time Will Clean the Carcass Bones by Lucia Perillo

Time Will Clean the Carcass Bones by Lucia Perillo

I first encountered Lucia Perillo when I was an in-house poetry intern at Copper Canyon Press, in January of 2012. I’d been in the small, wooden archives, dusting new shipments of books, cutting satisfyingly thick paper for mail orders, and breathing in the heady air of dust and ink. Suddenly, I saw a cover with an erratic jumble of color across the front, Inseminating the Elephant across the spine. It became my lunchtime book that day, and the day after, and the day after. And now, it’s old enough to become a hard-time book, a bath-time book, a friend-time book. “The cover looks that way because it is actually a painting done by an elephant,” the managing editor had told me. “And welcome to the press.”

Read More

Sex and Death by Ben Tanzer

Sex and Death by Ben Tanzer

In a literary world already graced by the likes of D.H. Lawrence, one might wonder if we really need another book about the passions and anxieties surrounding Sex and Death's titular themes. The answer may well be yes, if that book is written by Ben Tanzer. With prose free of poetic frill and all the more dense in meaning for its formal compactness, Sex and Death is proof that Tanzer has his finger on the pulse of the still vibrant humanity underscoring the impacts of modern gender roles, familial relations, and technology on our experiences of intimacy.

Read More

Pink Museum by Caroline Crew

Pink Museum by Caroline Crew

Caroline Crew's poetry collection, Pink Museum, is compiled of five poetic sections, including one named with the book’s title. The Pink Museum possesses a singular, recurring theme, which encompasses the rest. Crew's poems reflect a certain kind of feminine mysticism influenced by Victorian sonnets, particularly those written by Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

Read More

What Comes from a Thing by Phillip Barron

What Comes from a Thing by Phillip Barron

In What Comes from a Thing, Phillip Barron reveals the essence that seeps from the mundane just beneath our attention. He dwells within the blurred borders between nature and the hollow shells of artifice that seem to develop not on the geographical edges of civilization, but on its perceptual edges. 

Read More

Carl Schmitt: A Biography by Reinhard Mehring

Carl Schmitt: A Biography by Reinhard Mehring

Reinhard Mehring’s Carl Schmitt: A Biography, dutifully translated by Daniel Steuer, is a difficult book for two reasons. At well over 500 pages, with complex jargon and a healthy dose of German-language legalese, it is an exceptionally dense biography by necessity; to truly appreciate Schmitt, the man and one of the leading legal minds of the Third Reich, understanding his juridic and philosophical development is a prerequisite for virtually all else. While his life’s broad personal and familial outlines are thoroughly rendered in the text, it is his ideas, his arguments, his contributions to Nazism which appropriately receive primary attention. Second, and related to the focus on Schmitt’s evolving political thought, this book is difficult for the reading experience it provides—a brilliant man’s steady descent from the traditions of realist international relations theories and debates over the role of the state toward justifying and rationalizing total state capacity for domination of civic life.

Read More