Ali Giordani

The Boss by Victoria Chang

The Boss by Victoria Chang

Victoria Chang’s The Boss serves up poems reminiscent of repetitious schoolyard rhymes. Her collection takes on large concepts: life, capitalism, ancestral memories, death, and examines how our daily interactions become the metaphysical. With most poems only taking up one page, and a few stretching to two, Chang’s writing utilizes each empathetic word. At it’s pinnacle, The Boss throws back the curtain and places us at the epicenter of a conversation stripped of niceties or answers; instead, Chang grants the opportunity to not only survive, but thrive in the unknown.

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Air Carnation by Guadalupe Muro

Air Carnation by Guadalupe Muro

Argentina-born writer Guadalupe Muro’s naturalist approach to prose comes to light in Air Carnation. Playing with boundaries of non-fiction and fiction, Muro presents short pieces that weave family, friendship, love, and conflict. Muro’s ability to move between comedy and trauma, belonging and displacement, and the divine and the ordinary results in a series that explores the imperfections and convergences of such dichotomies. Air Carnation is a story of the actuality of her own life as a daughter, lover, friend, and artist. In a climate of overwhelming obsession with identity politics, Muro transcends what it means to occupy categories of difference. Her honesty regarding her upbringing is not self-serving, moving past tokenization or fetishization—this is a woman who seeks her own truth. She is a child of hippies, who were children of the 1960s; she does not romanticize or penalize, and her refusal to come to such simple conclusions is exactly what allows Air Carnation to be so inciting.

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